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How PT-305 Got Her Custom Portholes

PT-305: Note the porthole next to the nickname.

PT-305: Note the porthole next to the nickname.

Patrol-torpedo boats designed by Higgins Industries were not equipped with portholes. They also did not have air conditioning, meaning summer nights in the crew’s quarters were hot and stuffy. In September 1944, PT-305 briefly operated out of Saint-Tropez, France, but that short time was long enough for the crew to transform the boat. Torpedoman’s Mate Jim Nerison wrote about the change he made to PT-305:

“Squadron 22 was moved to Saint-Tropez in southern France. We took over an upscale marina and hotel on the French Rivera. Close to the marina was an abandoned boatyard containing quite a few damaged yachts. A buddy and I were nosing around the yard and noticed some brightly polished bronze portholes on one of the vessels. We went back to our boat, got some tools, returned, and removed two of the ports.

“On the condition that the ports would be sealed during night operations, I got permission from the skipper to install them on each side of the hull of our boat. To obtain better ventilation, I mounted one next to my bunk in the crew’s quarters and one on the opposite side of the boat.

“Almost 60 years later, in the ‘All Hands’ section of a publication distributed by PT Boats Inc., I came across a picture of a boat claiming to be PT-305. The boat was being used as an oyster scow in the Chesapeake Bay. It had very little resemblance to the boat that I remembered, except the general hull design and the configuration of the wood planking on its sides. Then I noticed the porthole on the starboard side up near the bow. Yes indeed, that was PT-305! She didn’t look like the fast, powerful and daring vessel originally commissioned in New Orleans, but then, neither do the two surviving members of her original crew.”

Portholes were also installed in the officer’s quarters of PT-305, and several other PT boats in Squadron 22 installed portholes as well. All of the original portholes were still installed in PT-305 when The National WWII Museum acquired the boat in 2007. In 2015, they were restored and returned to their wartime locations on the hull.

Read more about PT-305 here. Read more about PT-305’s nickname U.S.S. Sudden Jerk here.

PT-305: A service-era photo showing a custom porthole.

PT-305: A service-era photo showing one of the custom portholes.

March Classroom of the Month — Get In the Scrap!

Each month the Museum will feature a standout classroom participating in Get in the Scrap!. Get in the Scrap! is a national service learning project about recycling and energy conservation, inspired by the scrapping efforts of students during World War II.  Each featured class does stellar work to make a difference in their school, home, community and even the planet!

For March, we’re featuring students from the Monroe Elementary group in Enid, Oklahoma, who are using Get in the Scrap! to help learn more about kids like them and their role in WWII.  The students and their teacher, Amanda Purdy, sat down to answer a few questions for us about their work with Get in the Scrap!

Monroe Elementary students proudly display their recycling box.

Monroe Elementary students proudly display their recycling box.

Team Name: The Energies

Number of Get in the Scrap! points thus far: 57

How has Get in the Scrap! been a good fit for your curriculum? Please explain: 

“Our interest in WWII began with a book that we read by Kirby Larson called Dash.  My students wanted to know more about kids their age during WWII, so Get in the Scrap! was a perfect way to answer their questions and give them hands-on learning activities to participate in throughout the program.”

What has been your favorite activity? Why?

“Our favorite project so far has been the scrap catchers!   We were very surprised with the answers to some of the questions we researched.   My students created a recycling box for our room after doing this project.  They have been reminding each other (and me!) that paper goes in the recycling box not the trash.”

This is just one of the many amazing classrooms participating in the Get in the Scrap! national service learning project. You can learn more and sign up your classroom today at getinthescrap.org!

Post by Savannah Bamburg, Education Intern @ The National WWII Museum 

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WWII Quiz Bowl Finals Telecast Set for March 30 on Cox Communications

 

Teams from 23 high schools competed in the Museum’s 13th annual WWII Quiz Bowl on Saturday, March 11.

Teams from 23 high schools competed in the Museum’s 13th annual WWII Quiz Bowl on Saturday, March 11.

Teams from 23 high schools competed in The National WWII Museum’s 13th annual WWII Quiz Bowl on Saturday, March 11, with the St. Thomas High School Chindits of Houston and the Jesuit High School Enola Jays of New Orleans emerging as finalists. Congratulations to all who participated!

The finals will be televised live by Cox Communications at 6:00 p.m. March 30 on YurView (Channel 4 in New Orleans). The action will also stream live everywhere at YurView.com. Follow the Museum on Twitter (@WWIIMuseum) to receive start-time prompts. YurView replays of the March 11 event have aired in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Lafayette, Louisiana; Roanoke, Virginia; Pensacola, Florida; and Fort Smith, Arkansas; among other markets.

To find the live stream, visit the above address and enter “Quiz Bowl” in the search box. There, at 6 p.m. Thursday, you’ll find the St. Thomas High School Chindits of Houston and the Jesuit High School Enola Jays of New Orleans battling for the crown of 2017 WWII Quiz Bowl champs. Good luck to both teams!

The WWII Quiz Bowl is sponsored by The New Orleans Advocate.

 

Quiz Bowl finalists: Tyler McStravick, Nate Belcher, and Nicholas Kurzy of St. Thomas High School; quizmaster and Museum Director of Education Kenneth Hoffman; Matthew Granier, Ethan Lagrand, and Preston Warwick of Jesuit High School.

Quiz Bowl finalists: Tyler McStravick, Nate Belcher, and Nicholas Kurzy of St. Thomas High School; quizmaster and Museum Director of Education Kenneth Hoffman; Matthew Granier, Ethan Lagrand, and Preston Warwick of Jesuit High School.

Watch the 2016 finals here.

 

 

 

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The Story Behind PT-305’s Nickname, ‘U.S.S. Sudden Jerk’

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Patrol-torpedo boats were only given a numerical hull designation, unlike their larger counterparts. Crews were allowed to give their boats a nickname, and often got creative. Nicknames for some of PT-305’s squadron mates were USS Cherry (PT-304), La-Dee-Da (PT-308), Oh Frankie (PT-309), and Sea-wolf (PT-313). PT-305 was given two confirmed nicknames during the war, the first coming from a crew mishap, as told by Baker First Class Benedict Bronder, from Minnesota. Bronder came aboard PT-305 with the first crew in 1943.

“The one we had was Sudden Jerk, he said. “And the way they got that (was) they were backing in to park it and they sped up a little bit too much and when it come back, it hit where it was tied up. And they said ‘That was a sudden jerk!’ and then they said, ‘That’s a good name!’ It didn’t ruin anything on the boat, but that’s where it got the name Sudden Jerk.” She carried that name throughout 1944 and into 1945, when a new crew renamed her. Stay tuned for the story of the Half Hitch!

Service-era photo: Lieutenant William Borsdorff, from New York, served as the first commanding officer aboard PT-305 from November 1943 until June 1944. He then took a squadron command position and directed patrols. He is shown here in late 1944, aboard the USS Sudden Jerk in Leghorn, Italy. Photo gift of Mitch Cirlot 2014.445.086.

Read more: pt305.org.

Bataan Death March Survivor Lester Tenney Dies at Age 96

Lester Tenney during World War II.

Lester Tenney during World War II.

Lester Tenney, a survivor of the Bataan Death March whose harrowing oral-history account of his ordeal as a WWII prisoner of war is an unforgettable component of The National WWII Museum’s Digital Collections, died Friday, February 24, in Carlsbad, California. He was 96.

Tenney’s postwar life was dedicated to education—both as a university business professor and as a staunch advocate for his fellow POWs in the quest for official acknowledgment by Japan of the wartime atrocities they endured. He was a regular speaker at the Museum, most recently capping the 2016 International Conference on World War II with a stirring presentation titled “The Courage to Remember: PTSD—From Trauma to Triumph.”

“He gave the speech of his life,” said Gordon H. “Nick” Mueller, PhD, the Museum’s president and CEO, in a message to his staff following news of Tenney’s death. “Lester’s DNA resides in this Museum.”

Tenney was tank commander with the 192nd Tank Battalion when he, along with 9,000 American and 60,000 Filipino troops, surrendered to the Japanese at the Battle of Bataan in April 1942. The ensuing Bataan Death March killed thousands during a 90-mile forced march to POW Camp O’Donnell.

“Number one, we had no food or water,” said Tenney in his Museum oral history. “Number two, you just kept walking the best way you could. It wasn’t a march. It was a trudge. . . . Most of the men were sick, they had dysentery, they had malaria, they had a gunshot wound.”

Their Japanese captors showed no mercy for the ill or wounded, Tenney said. “A man would fall down and they would holler at him to get up,” he added. “I saw a case where they didn’t even holler at him. The man fell down, the Japanese took a bayonet and put it in him. I mean, two seconds.”

Tenney’s march lasted 10 days. Conditions at Camp O’Donnell killed thousands more prisoners. Tenney survived that camp and others, passage to Japan in a “hell ship,” torture, and three years of forced labor in a coal mine before he was liberated at the end of the war. His WWII experiences, which he documented in a memoir titled My Hitch in Hell, haunted him all of his life.

“I feel guilty many times, even today,” Tenney said in his oral history. “I feel guilty that I’m back. I feel guilty that I’m living such a wonderful life. I feel guilty that a lot of my friends didn’t come back. Nothing I can do about it, but I can feel guilty because I feel that they were better than I was. I’m sure that my buddies who came back all feel the same.”

After the publication of his memoir in 1995, Tenney “shifted into a role as a prominent thorn-in-the-side of Japanese authorities unwilling or unable to acknowledge what had happened during the war,” said his obituary in The San Diego Union-Tribune. “Stories he shared with reporters, civic leaders, schoolchildren in the United States and Japan,” along with his published memoir, “eventually wrung apologies from government leaders and from one of the corporate giants that benefited from POW slavery.”

Tenney is survived by his wife of nearly 57 years, Betty, a son, two stepsons, seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Our deepest condolences go out to his family, friends, and fellow WWII veterans. Our gratitude for Lester Tenney’s service and sacrifice—and for his decades of dedication to ensuring that his wartime experiences and those of his fellow POWs would not be forgotten—lives on.

Lester Tenney's oral history is part of The National WWII Museum's Digital Collections.

Lester Tenney’s oral history is part of The National WWII Museum’s Digital Collections.

February Classroom of the Month— Get in the Scrap!

Each month the Museum will feature a standout classroom participating in Get in the Scrap! Get in the Scrap! is a national service learning project about recycling and energy conservation, inspired by the scrapping efforts of students during World War II.  Each featured class does stellar work to make a difference in their school, home, community and even the planet!

For February, we’re featuring students at American Corner Karaganda group who are using Get in the Scrap! to help learn English in Kazakhstan.  The students and their teacher, Taryn U’Halie, sat down to answer a few questions for us about their work with Get in the Scrap!

The American Corner Karaganda group with their 25 point prize — a Get in the Scrap! refrigerator magnet. Students also proudly display their Quote Promise Pix.

The American Corner Karaganda group with their 25 point prize — a Get in the Scrap! refrigerator magnet. Students also proudly display their Quote Promise Pix.

Team Name: KZ Junior Army

Number of Get in the Scrap! points thus far: 27

How has Get in the Scrap! been a good fit for your curriculum? Please explain: 

“The GITS service-learning project has been a strong edition to the free English courses that are provided at the Karaganda library that house the American Corner sponsored by the U.S. Embassy in Astana. I’ve used the lessons to improve intermediate to advanced English language learners in the community, but it has also expanded their learning on U.S. American History during WWII. It has spread an awareness of recycling and energy conservation as it pertains to the U.S. and Kazakhstan.  Mainly, it has connected the class participants with a love for learning science and how ecology is a global concern for humans worldwide.”

The students’ general consensus is Get in the Scrap! helps develops their English language skills. The students feel, “Get in the Scrap helps to know interesting topics and to improve communicating skills by discussing it” and “The program has helped me practice my speaking english by interacting with the teacher and other students.”

What has been your favorite activity? Why?

Quote Promise Pix, where students each make an individual promise to conserve energy or recycle. Some remarks from students:

“My favorite activity is making a promise because it helps up to set up goals.”

“Most of all I liked giving a promise.  I felt like I was able to contribute to saving of energy.”

“Giving a promise is my favorite activity because with #getinthescrap (hashtag) we can share with people around the world and it gives us that we are not alone.”

“I have enjoyed “to pledge” activity because I’ve been able to enrich my vocabulary and shared my ideas with my classmates.”

This is just one of the many amazing classrooms participating in the Get in the Scrap! national service learning project. You can learn more and sign up your classroom today at getinthescrap.org!

Post by Savannah Bamburg, Education Intern @ The National WWII Museum

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SciTech Tuesday: Radar Research Led to Astronomical Discoveries

JS Hey died on 27 February of 2000, at the age of 81.

Born in Lancashire, England, he was the third son of a cotton manufacturer. He entered University of Manchester and got his degree in physics in 1930, and a masters in x-ray crystallography in 1931.

Hey taught physics at schools in Northern England until 1942, when he joined the Army Operational Research Group. We was assigned to work on radar jamming. At that point the Allies were using a form of radar with relatively long waves. Axis forces could not only detect this radar, but jam it. Using radar jamming two German warships had recently escaped through the English Channel. At the same time the Allies were losing an unsustainable tonnage of cargo to U-Boats in the Atlantic.

75 years ago this month Hey was monitoring radar jamming when he noticed a great deal of noise in the 4-8 m jamming Allied radar sets. Following the source, he noticed that it moved slowly, tracking the sun. Looking up meteorological data, he discovered that the Sun had a very active solar spot that day. Solar spots had been hypothesized to produce streams of ions and magnetic fields. Hey interpreted the phenomenon of the radar jamming as support of this hypothesis.

Development of radar using much shorter waves generated by the cavity magnetron allowed the Allies to avoid jamming by the Axis powers. Using this microwave radar Hey was tracking V2 rockets heading towards London in 1945 when he noticed transient radar echoes at about 60 miles of altitude. The echoes arrived at a rate of 5-10 per hour and persisted after the V2s were gone. It turned out the echoes were the vapor trails of meteors, and Hey showed that meteors could be tracked this way in the day when they were not visible to the eye.

JS Hey was not able to publish his results until after the war, for security reasons. Shortly after the war he was appointed to head the Army Operational Research Group, and he worked at the Royal Radar Establishment, where he continued his work in radio astronomy.

Posted by Rob Wallace, STEM Education Coordinator at The National WWII Museum

The National WWII Museum Social Media Guidelines

State of Deception

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda

Dear Friends,

News of the opening of “State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda,” a powerful exhibition created by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, has already generated some passionate conversation on social media.

We’re honored to be hosting this thought-provoking exhibition, which was created in 2009 by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and has been displayed in other great institutions around the country, including the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago and, most recently, the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin, Texas. State of Deception is a historical study of propaganda, and poses questions about the power of communication and the importance of mindful media consumption. Some have asked if the Museum timed the exhibit to coincide with the current political climate. We did not. In fact, the exhibition has been scheduled since January 2015, and was created by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum before that—in 2009. However, we know that the tone of the recent election and other current events have heightened sensitivity to this subject matter.

Please note that the exhibit itself (which predates the recent election by seven years) does not have any political agenda. Nor does the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum or The National WWII Museum. Rather, the exhibition’s goal is to raise questions about the power of propaganda and to encourage people to think critically about the messages they receive. It’s exciting to see that the exhibit is already striking a chord with so many.

We encourage you to visit the exhibition while it’s in residence at the Museum (through June 18) or experience it virtually via the links presented below to form your own opinions. On Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, we’ll share the latest news about the exhibit and surrounding programs, and we hope you’ll Like and Follow us to hear the latest. These channels are also a wonderful forum for discussion and we welcome your engagement! However, in order to ensure that the conversation remains welcoming to all who view our posts—including people of every political stripe as well as school groups, veterans and their families, Museum visitors, and more—we ask that all commenters on these channels remain mindful of the educational intent of these posts, and respectful of the community receiving them.

To that end, please pause before posting to consider the following social media guidelines, modeled on the guidelines used by our friends at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum to encourage an engaging, inclusive dialog.

Social media guidelines:

The goal of our social media platforms is to share news of The National WWII Museum and World War II, and secondarily offer a forum for conversation and feedback about our posts. We reserve the right to remove posts and comments that violate these guidelines:

— Comments should be relevant to the post’s topic.

— Courtesy is essential. Comments with vulgarity, threats, or abuse aimed at others are not acceptable.

— Comments are an appropriate place to question or disagree with ideas and opinions, but not make attacks against groups or individuals.

— Comments that share misleading or historically inaccurate information will be deleted.

Thank you for your thoughtful consideration of the above guidelines, and thank you for your continuing support of The National WWII Museum.

Our social media channels:

Facebook: Facebook.com/WWIIMuseum

Twitter: @WWIIMuseum

Instagram: wwiimuseum

State of Deception links:

Find a listing of all of the public programming scheduled for the exhibition here.

Find the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s main site for the exhibition here.

Find the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s accompanying educational site here.

Watch a live walk-through of State of Deception with United States Holocaust Memorial Museum educator Sonia Booth here.

Stream the January 26 opening reception for the exhibition here.

Watch a Lunchbox Lecture by Assistant Director of Education Gemma Birnbaum about propaganda specifically aimed at the youth of Nazi Germany here.

 

 

 

More than prepared: Girl Scouts during WWII

Home Front Friday is a regular series that highlights the can do spirit on the Home Front during World War II and illustrates how that spirit is still alive today!

The Girl Scout way and motto is described simply as “Be Prepared”. However, a more in depth description that was formed in 1947, according to the Girl Scout website, would be as follows:

“A Girl Scout is ready to help out wherever she is needed. Willingness to serve is not enough; you must know how to do the job well, even in an emergency”.

Perhaps that explanation and the year in which it was stated can be attributed to how the Girl Scouts along with the rest of America had just endured World War II and the attitude on the Home Front that was necessary. During the war years, every one’s help was needed and the Girl Scouts took their motto to heart by demonstrating the very Home Front spirit we like to highlight with this blog.

Girl Scouts were involved in helping the war effort in a variety of ways. They helped sell war bonds, tend victory gardens, and scrapped metals and fat to be reused. Girl Scouts also formed “Defense Institutes” for teaching women necessary skills and ways to comfort children during possible air raids. Troupes even made calendars instead of the Girl Scout cookies we all know and love today, so they could help with food rationing.

Girl Scout Calendar from 1945. Photo courtesy of the National WWII Museum collection.

Girl Scout Calendar from 1945. Photo courtesy of the National WWII Museum collection.

 

Inside of a Girl Scout Calendar. Photo courtesy of the National WWII Museum.

Inside of a Girl Scout Calendar. Photo courtesy of the National WWII Museum.

Their uniform even changed its look from a dress with a zipper to one with buttons because of metal shortages.

Intermediate Girl Scout Uniform style from 1938-1948. Photo courtesy of the National WWII Museum collection.

Intermediate Girl Scout Uniform style from 1938-1948. Photo courtesy of the National WWII Museum collection.

Girl Scout ads and catalog covers also had patriotic themes to them to support the war cause.

Equipment catalog cover from Spring 1942. Photo courtesy of Vintage Girl Scout website.

Equipment catalog cover from Spring 1942. Photo courtesy of Vintage Girl Scout website.

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Equipment catalog cover from Fall 1943. Photo courtesy of Vintage Girl Scout website.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Newspaper ad. Image courtesy of Vintage Girl Scout website.

The Girl Scouts kept the Home Front positive attitude alive during the war with all of these deeds and patriotism. Just as they are still keeping the same creed and way of helping people to this day. The museum celebrated National Girl Scout Day at the museum last March, where they made rag dolls with the troupes of scouts who visited the museum.

Girl Scout Day at the NWWII Museum. Photo courtesy of Lauren Handley.

Girl Scout Day at the NWWII Museum. Photo courtesy of Lauren Handley.

Girl Scout Day at the NWWII Museum. Photo courtesy of Lauren Handley.

Girl Scout Day at the NWWII Museum. Photo courtesy of Lauren Handley.

The rag doll activity incorporates some of the same ideas Girl Scouts and Americans had on the Home Front during the war by taking commonly found materials like cotton balls and scraps of fabric along with string or ribbon you have lying around and reusing them to make a doll. If you’d like to join in the fun and make a doll of your own, just follow the steps below! You can even help someone much like those Girl Scouts during the war years did by giving the doll to someone of your choosing and brightening their day. The Girl Scout slogan after all is, “Do a good turn daily” .

Rag Doll Instructions

Materials:

  • Various lengths of fabric (pillow ticking, camouflage, leaves, red, yellow, black, blue)
    • 9×9 inch square of material for head and body
    • 13×9 inch rectangle of material for arms
    • 9×5 inch square of material for dress/clothing
    • 6 inch length of ribbon to secure dress/clothing
  • Dowels (small)
  • Scissors (dull, safety)
  • Twine (or thread)
  • Ribbon (various colors)
  • Cotton balls or tissue

Step 1:  Place the 9×9 inch square of material facing pattern downwards.  Place the TWO cotton balls into the middle of the 9×9 inch piece of material.

Step 2: Wrap the material around the cotton balls to create the doll’s head and body.

Step 3: To create the effect of a neck, twist the material beneath the doll’s head and tie a knot to hold it in place with the twine or string.  Leave the ends of the string long and loose as they will be used to attach the arms.

Step 1

Step 1

Step 2

Step 2

Step 3

Step 3

 

Step 4: Place the 13×9 inch rectangle of material facing pattern downwards.

Step 5: Use the small dowel to roll up the material – long-ways – like a carpet.

Step 6: After your material is rolled, remove the dowel.  This will be your two arms.  Tie a knot near each end to create hands.

Step 4

Step 4

Step 5

Step 5

Step 6

Step 6

Step 7: Center and place the arms against the knot on the doll’s neck.  Use the two long, loose ends of twine to secure the arms in place by crossing them over the arms and across the doll’s chest like a bandolier before tying them into a knot behind the doll’s back.

Step 8: Fold the selected 9×5 piece of material in half and snip a small triangle-shape into the middle of the seam to create a hole for the doll’s head.

Step 9: Unfold the material and slip over the doll’s head.

Step 10: Secure the dress/clothing in place by tying a knot around the doll’s waist using one of the lengths of ribbon.

Step 7

Step 7

Step 8

Step 8

Step 9

Step 9

Step 10

Step 10

Now you’re all done with making your rag doll! Enjoy!

Posted by Savannah Bamburg, Education Intern and Lauren Handley, Assistant Director of Education for Public Programs at The National WWII Museum.

Help Judge National History Day

National History Day JudgingThe National WWII Museum is looking for teachers and professors, historians, undergraduates and graduate students, museum professionals or anyone with a love of history and community to help judge this year’s National History Day contests!

National History Day is a year-long historical research contest for middle and high school students. Each year, students from across Louisiana create documentaries, research papers, performances, websites or exhibits based upon the annual contest theme. A major benefit to students participating in National History Day besides the fun and excitement of creating an original work is the outside review of that work by volunteer judges, who donate their time to review students’ projects, make suggestions for improvement and determine the entries that will advance to the next round of competition.

Judging is an integral part of the National History Day process. The feedback that students receive is critical to their growth as young researchers. Most of the students will not pursue history as their college major or career choice, however, the skills that the students hone in creating their National History Day projects will apply to any college or career path that they choose. The National WWII Museum is always looking for volunteers who possess both foundational knowledge of history and great communication skills to serve as judges. No prior experience is necessary besides an enthusiasm and interest in encouraging middle and high school students in their research and work!

Judges are needed for Regional Contests in New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Lafayette, Shreveport and Monroe as well as the State Contest in New Orleans which determines which students go on to represent Louisiana at the national competition in Washington D.C.. The dates for all Regional as well as the State Contest can be found below along with the sign-up form to serve as a National History Day judge.

2017 Louisiana History Day Contest Dates:

Baton Rouge: March 25, 2017

Lafayette: March 11, 2017

Monroe: March 11, 2017

New Orleans: March 25, 2017

Shreveport: March 11, 2017

Louisiana State History Day: April 8, 2017

The National History Day program is exciting and fun, however, the benefits for participation for students working with primary sources and performing original research are very real and can earn them rewards both inside and outside the classroom such as scholarship moneys, special prizes and even paid educational travel.  That said, none of this would be possible without the generous help and support of our volunteer contest judges.

Sign up now to judge National History Day!

Find out more about Louisiana’s National History Day program.

 

For other questions on how to get involved with National History Day, contact the Museum’s Student Program’ Coordinator, Collin Makamson @ 504-528-1944 ext. 304 or historyday@nationalww2museum.org.